Cadet Wine & Beer Bar

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By Craig Smith

Colleen Fleming and Aubrey Bailey, co-owners of Cadet Beer and Wine Bar, are very happy with how well their business has been received in the year and a half they’ve been open. Theirs was a concept that didn’t exist, and people love it.

“We envisioned a place to drink funky wine and beer past 9 p.m. in a fun environment with cool music,” said Fleming, who first conceived of the idea of Cadet. Bailey added, “It also has to be whole heartedly for the community.” Cadet has indeed been embraced by locals, including the wine community. “We get lots of industry people here, from
cellar rats to wine makers,” added Fleming. “There is a lot of sharing, mingling and meeting other people.”

Fleming said she is like many people, in that she wants to be her own boss. She spent years cooking in Napa restaurants such as Roux and Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen, then worked for her family’s winery, Kelly Fleming Wines, selling their cult estate-Cabernets. Bailey, her roommate at the time, had an equally impressive resume, having cooked in Napa
restaurants including Redd and Julia’s Kitchen. She was a sommelier at The French Laundry, and listened as Fleming fleshed out the idea for Cadet. “When Colleen said she

needed a partner, it was serendipitous, and I thought ‘Why not?” Fleming laughs, “I lured Aubrey away from the best restaurant in the country to open a bar in an alley.”

The name Cadet implies a trainee, beginner, someone excited to learn. “That’s how it should be for our guests and for us,” said Fleming. The two women initially thought they’d be a California wine bar, but tweaked the concept based on customer feedback. “Originally, we offered mostly California beers and wines,” said Bailey, “but a lot of guests wanted an international selection. It’s probably fifty-fifty now.”  Bailey said that helps industry folks. “If somebody is working on a new Syrah project, they can come here to drink wines from Rhone.” Beer has been a bigger hit than they expected.  “It’s crazy,” said Fleming. “People like to experiment and try something new. We constantly change the menu so that it’s never stale.”  Cadet always has six beers on tap and fifty different bottled beers, as well as sixteen wines by the glass. The wine and beer list is developed with the help of the customers and what they want to discover. “We’re lucky; they have good taste,” said Bailey, with a grin.

Wednesday nights feature a wine or beer maker as guest bartender. Hardly stuffy or pedantic affairs, the evenings are fun and casual. “We let them be bartenders for a night and pour and talk,” said Fleming. “Some even bring their own music.” Matthiasson Wines was recently featured. “They got to talk to a new generation of wine drinkers in a casual, fun atmosphere,” said Bailey.

The bar bites are a big part of Cadet. “We buy salumi from Oenotri and slice it here,” said Fleming. “We also have a proscuitto plate and grilled cheese, all served as bar bites.” The outdoor patio with its marketplace lights, tucked away as Cadet is in an alleyway, offers a cozy, neighborhood feel.

Cadet is open Monday through Thursday from 5:00 p.m. to Midnight, Fridays and Saturdays until 1:30 a.m. Stop in and enjoy a completely unpretentious evening.

930 Franklin Street, Napa  |  (707) 927-3623    |  cadetbeerandwinebar.com

Open Monday – Thursday 5PM – Midnight  |  Friday & Saturday 5PM – 1:30AM

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EarthDay – Celebrate at at the Oxbow Commons

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Come join in the festivities at this year’s Earth Day Celebration on Saturday, April 23rd! Bring the whole family to join in the celebration and learn about our local environment. Earth Day attendees will discover many environmental exhibitor booths featuring products, services, games, and fun children’s activities. Great information will be available on a host of topics, including alternative energy, supporting local agriculture, watershed health, pollution prevention, conservation, local stewardship opportunities, and much more. This year the event has a great new location- the Oxbow Commons! So, come join the fun in their new location beside the Napa River from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.!

In addition to educational booths from local groups and businesses, there will be entertainment for the whole family. Great local bands and dancers will perform throughout the day.

Delicious local food, beer, and wine will be sold. Proceeds from beverage sales at Earth Day fund field-trip bus grants offered every year by the Environmental Education Coalition of Napa County (EECNC), the event host. EECNC funds field trips for Napa County students to visit sites such as Connolly Ranch, Bothe State Park, Lake Hennessey, and the Napa River Eco reserve where they can gain an appreciation of the local environment.  

Proceeds from beverage sales also support the Darcy Aston Environmental Advocacy Scholarship, which is awarded to a local student intending to pursue a career in the sciences.

Be a friend to the Earth and ride your bike to the event where the Napa County Bicycle Coalition will offer free valet bike parking! Attendees are encouraged to bring their own water bottle and stop by our “Water Bar” filling station.

If you want to start the day lending a hand to clean up our local environment,

they have the perfect opportunity for you! Join the Napa RCD and Spring Clean at several sites throughout downtown Napa to pick up litter in the creeks, river, and on our streets. The cleanup runs from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. visit naparcd.org for more information.

The fun doesn’t stop when the Earth Day festival ends! If you want more music, dancing, food, movement classes, nature hikes, stargazing, and great aerial and fire performances, head to Earth Night at Connolly Ranch from 5pm to 10pm!  Visit connollyranch.org for more information and to buy tickets.

Sustaining sponsors of the Earth Day celebration are the Napa Green Certified Land & Winery Programs, Healthy Buildings USA and Latitude 38 Entertainment. For a complete list of additional sponsors, exhibitors, food and beverage vendors, and entertainment, or to learn how to participate in this year’s Earth Day celebration, visit EarthDayNapa.com.

Napa Valley Arts in April

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by Kristin Ranuio

What do Andy Warhol, Rembrandt, and the Calistoga Camera Club student have in common? You can see work by all of them, and much, much, more, at the fifth annual, Napa Valley Arts in April, featuring works that span artistic disciplines, mediums, genres, and decades.

During the entire month of April, there are dozens of special shows, exhibits, openings, and events celebrating the arts and artists. Events are being held throughout the Valley, from American Canyon to Calistoga, with offerings in American Canyon, Napa, Yountville, Oakville, Rutherford, St. Helena, and Calistoga. Many of the events are free to attend; less than thirty percent will be charging an entry fee, and most of those are under twenty dollars.

The month begins with the “Kick off Arts in April” reception at the Napa Valley Museum in Yountville on April 2, 2015. Events that follow include Art, Sip, and Stroll in Yountville, a behind- the-scenes tour of the 15,000 sq. ft. studio of renowned local artist, Gordon Huether, anonymous urban art at a preview tour of the Napa Valley Ruins & Gardens, and an Art, Antique & Collectible Appraisal Day at the Napa Valley Museum. Visitors may bring in their goods to get a verbal,      

auction, market value for a donation of ten dollars per item; up to five items per person may be evaluated.

Also included is the month–long, Inspiration Station, an exhibition showcasing the original works of Heidi Barrett at the Napa Valley Wine Train Station, The Art of Life presented by Festival del Sole and The Hess Collection, iPhonic Art: Astonishing iPhotography at Markham Vineyards in partnership with Knox Production of Pixels and long-time friend of the winery, Rolling Stone Magazine’s first chief photographer, Baron Wolman, a behind the scenes tour of internationally-renowned artist, Carlo Marchiori’s Villa Ca’Toga, and so many more. There are exhibits, interactive tours, private collections open to the public for the event, artist meet-and-greets, and dozens of other offerings to help quench your cultural thirst.

Participating wineries offer a wide range of events and exhibits, including tours of permanent, and rotating, collections. It offers the opportunity to see wineries you may have been to before in a new way, and to explore new ones, while viewing art and meeting artists. Rather than traveling to Italy or New York to see great works, we have the chance to see them right in our own backyard.

New to Napa Valley Arts in April is the Creative Change Program, launched in conjunction with Arts Council Napa Valley. Throughout the month, partnering businesses and wineries have committed to donate a percentage of their proceeds, or offering an easy way to guests to contribute to help the Arts Council Napa Valley reach their goal of $20,000 by the end of June. Funds collected stay in the community, including helping to keep arts and music alive and well in local schools. This means a chance to do something worthwhile, while having a good time. Creative Change Partners include Andaz Napa, Cairdean Estate, Gordon Huether Studio, Engage Art Fair, Humanitas (sister label to Jessup Cellars, part of Good Life Wine Collective), and the Napa Valley Wine Train.

Napa Valley Wine Train Proprietor and Director of Marketing, Kira Devitt, says,“We are delighted to give back to the local community and thank them for their ongoing support of the Napa Valley Wine Train. As the Wine Train is considered a rolling museum and a treasure in the valley, and the Arts Council Napa Valley strives to enrich the lives of the greater Napa community through arts and culture, we are honored to call the organization a partner.”

The month culminates in the final event of the celebration, Engage Art Festival, at the Napa County Fairgrounds, April 25 and 26.  This two-day, indoor, immersive-art exhibition offers the opportunity to experience the Napa Valley art culture in a dynamic environment, with gallery booths mixed in with active artists’ stations. Here you will have the opportunity to engage with the artists while sampling boutique wines, paired with the culinary artistry of local chefs. Arts in

April Producer, Danielle Smith, says this one is a must-do, with art ranging from classic to outrageous, and everything in between.

A complete listing of all exhibits, activities, special lodging packages and events can be found at VisitNapaValley.com/artsinapril.

BurgerFi – Great Burgers & Fries…

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By John & Dorothy Salmon

We took our very-sophisticated 10 and 13 year old granddaughters to BurgerFi for dinner to check out where their “burger palates” would take them and to help us review Napa’s newest burger joint. Our foray into BurgerFi was the “Kid Test” for burgers and, most of all, the fries, since that’s how they typically judge greatness in a restaurant.

Gracie and Arden were as excited as we were to dine inside the huge, metal two story box on the Napa River Walk. Finding parking in downtown Napa is always an adventure, but we were lucky enough to find a friendly soul who was just leaving as we arrived and happily gave us his parking place right in front of BurgerFi.  We couldn’t wait to check out the view as we climbed to the upstairs deck. You can’t miss BurgerFi, since it shines like a giant, square box of aluminum foil next to the Napa River on First Street between Soscol and Main Streets. Both girls said they liked the open feel of the building with the very cool deck to look out at the River. They were also impressed with the gigantic, eco-friendly fan, the light fixtures, the cool Coke machine, the burgers with BurgerFi stamped on the bun and the Rolling Stones music playing nonstop. Of course, they are always impressed when their grandparents can sing along without missing a word! Although, we must report that the Stones are even older than we are! BurgerFi does have a kind of 50’s and 60’s burger-joint feel, housed inside a 60’s, Lost in Space, George Jetson building.

For those of you who travel up and down the east coast, Florida, the Midwest and, more recently, Denver, and Mesa, Arizona, you might be long-standing fans of BurgerFi, which is a franchise operation headquartered in south Florida. They believe in being eco-friendly and they follow their philosophy by creating chairs from recycled Coke bottles and indoor tables made from recycled milk jugs. Instead of relying exclusively on air conditioning, much of their cooling comes from special, oversize ceiling fans that use 66% less electricity. Gracie really loved the big fan. Fitting right into the California scene, BurgerFi maintains a low carbon footprint and follows strict recycling programs for oil, cardboard, bottles and cans. They get to be on the “Good list” in Napa since we pride ourselves on being sustainable and as green as possible.

Napa’s BurgerFi is their 64th location, so all your east coast or south Florida relatives can feel right at home when they visit you this summer. Everything will be the same as home, except for the humidity. BurgerFi wants to create the “Burgerfication of the Nation” with all-natural Angus beef from cattle that are raised in the most stringent, free-range standards and burgers that are never frozen, never cooked in a microwave, have no hormones, no antibiotics and are guaranteed fresh, juicy and delicious!

The Napa BurgerFi menu offers burgers from $5.87, to their Brisket Burger for $9.97. You can build your own burger with a single, double or triple burger patty, add a fried egg, Blue Cheese, white cheese, Peter Luger Steak Sauce, grilled diced onions, Jalapeno Peppers, A-1 Sauce, BBQ sauce, hot sauce, or their special BurgerFi sauce! You might need to study the menu online at burgerfi.com/menu and make your choices before you get there! The servers are well trained, friendly and patient, as first time customers stand in awe and try to figure out what they want to order. We did it the easy way, with four cheeseburgers and the large bucket of fries. If you are not a burger fan, you can order all-natural hot dogs, chicken-apple hot dogs, Wagyu Kobe Beef hot dogs and lots of toppings, such as cheese and kraut, BurgerFi Chili and Hickory Bacon. We saw our pal, Cathy Holmes, that night and she told us that the hot dogs are really good too.  So, next time we will give those a try.

BurgerFi fries range from $3.27 for a pretty good size regular to their big bucket for $5.97 that can feed an army of people. You can get onions rings from $4.27 to $5.57 or do the very-hip cry & fries; an order of half fries and half onion rings for $5.57.  Add salt and vinegar, Parmesan cheese, hot Cajun sauce, cheese sauce, chili or chili and cheese sauce for a nominal fee. Now you can understand why we suggested that you consider your order before you get there!

The milk shakes are terrific, the floats and cows are really good and they serve ice cream in cups, cones or Sundays from $3.47 to $5.47 with a choice of toppings…if you have room to eat ice cream after ordering their burgers and fries. They have take-home ice cream in their Pints on The Run for $6.97.

They even have a “Secret Menu.” If you don’t want a meat burger, you can order a Hippie Veggie made with two, grilled, quinoa burgers served on a potato bun with a side of neon relish.  They also serve their fries well done and extra crispy or limp. We are not sure who might want limp fries, but if you do, this is the place for you. They serve cool craft beers and a moderate selection of wines, along with standard soft drinks, lemonade and Evian bottled water.

Business during the traditional off- peak hours is supplemented by custard sales as well as being a great place to meet for a craft beer or wine. Hey, we are in Napa, so they have to have wine and craft beer!  Custards, however, are pretty east coast.

The girls’ comments included: “Great views, nice ambiance, nice photos, the logos stamped on the burgers are VERY cool” and they loved the very hip, hard- plastic order trackers that light up when your order is about to be brought to you at your table. THAT is definitely something that rarely happens at burger joints. Gracie loved the Mexican coke bottle and ordered that right away. Arden and Dorothy ordered root beer floats and Papa John had a beer.

We had a great time. If you are a boater, kayaker or stand-up paddler, you can tie up at the downtown dock and walk to BurgerFi on the Napa River Walk. BurgerFi will be the go-to place with a great view for the 4th of July fireworks.

There are no salads, no chicken dishes, no sweet-potato fries, but its lot’s of fun and a throw- back experience for all of us who remember the 60’s.  BurgerFi has free Wi-Fi, which was especially important for 13 year-old Gracie. Dogs are also allowed. They cater meals if you want to buy burgers for your party and, best of all, there is no TV to distract you while you enjoy the view.

We will be there again for sure.  Now that Napa is the foodie place to go, there are many options for great burgers up and down the streets of downtown Napa and up and down the Valley…none in a structure like this however!

967 First Street | Napa, CA | (707) 927-5373 | burgerfi.com

Open Sun. – Thurs. 11a.m. – 11p.m. | Fri. & Sat. 11a.m. to midnight

   

Fun things to Do Downtown for the Holidays

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By Craig Smith

While it is hard to believe that another year has gone by, the good news is that it’s almost Christmas.  Who doesn’t love the return of Santa Claus?

There are lots of ways to enjoy time with the family during the month of December.  This year, include checking out all the decorated windows in Downtown Napa.  In fact, cast your vote for what you think is the best of the best.  Most stores will have ballots on-hand for you to fill out.  It’s simple – write down the store name of the window you like the most, and put it in the ballot box.  Winners will be selected on December 15th and will be posted on DoNapa.com by the 20th.  Even if you don’t make it down in time to vote, you can still stroll the streets and enjoy the sites.

Here are some other Holiday activities
to enjoy. Merry Christmas!

Carriage Rides

Bring the family for  free horse drawn carriage rides through downtown Napa. It’s one of the best ways to enjoy the Holiday lights on all the buildings, see what the Christmas windows look like in the stores, and just snuggle with the family.  One carriage leaves the Historic Napa Mill on each of the scheduled nights, a second one departs from Coombs Plaza at First and Coombs Street during the same time.  Ride either or both – there are two separate routes, with each route lasting about twenty minutes.  Spend the time between rides shopping and dining in beautiful downtown Napa.  If you enjoy it, come back the following week with your neighbors.  Thursdays, December 4th, 11th and 18th, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Holiday Trolley

Thanks in part to Beau Tours, who helped make the Holiday Wine Trolley available, everyone will be able to enjoy a free Trolley ride downtown.  Bring the family, friends or anybody else you’d like. The Christmas decorated trolley will be playing music of the season as it travels between five regular stops – at the Oxbow Public Market, Historic Napa Mill, Coombs Street at Second, First near Randolph, and at Main & Pearl Streets.  Signage will show you exactly where to get off and on.  Enjoy the whole loop at one time, or get on and off as you wish.  The trolley runs on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, from December 5th through the 21st, from 3 to 6 p.m.

Ice Skating

Now through  January 11th, children of all ages and those young at heart will be able to ice skate in
downtown Napa. The 6300 sq ft outdoor rink has
stainless steel railings, a quality ice surface, a real Zamboni, hot chocolate, and your favorite Christmas music. Situated in the parking lot at the north east
corner of Coombs and Second streets, the rink will be open until 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and until 8 p.m. on Sundays. It opens at 12 noon when school is out, 2 p.m. when students are in class. Skating is
only $12 per person, which includes skate rentals.
More information is available at Napaonice.com.

Christmas is
a magic time of year.  Join your family and friends in Downtown Napa to shop, dine and enjoy the season.

DoNapa.com

Dan & Marguerite Capp’s – Capp Heritage Vineyards and Tasting Room

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By Craig Smith

Dan Capp, a fifth generation Napan and owner of Capp Heritage Tasting Room at the corner of First and Randolph Street in downtown Napa, drove a tractor on the family farm, as he says, “as soon as my legs were long enough to reach the pedals.”   Until he reached that height, he lugged boxes of peaches and apricots, some weighing almost as much as he did, to customer’s cars.  Farming is basically all he’s ever done, planting his first vineyard in 1973.  He and wife Marguerite have produced award winning wines, but it’s hard work.  That’s okay though – Capp comes from hearty stock.

Capp’s great-great grandmother, Frances Griffith, came to the Napa Valley at 13 years of age, on what may have been the first wagon train party to successfully make it over the Sierras, in 1845.  Her family had been living in Missouri, where times were tough.  The family sold everything they had, purchasing plows, seed, clothes and tools to start a new life in Oregon.  The oxen that pulled the wagons would pull the plows at their new home.  One hundred and thirty-five wagons started the trip to Oregon Territory.  Along the way, some of the group decided to come to the Napa Valley instead, and thirty wagons broke away and headed out on their own.

The trip took six months.  When the smaller party reached the Sierras, they fashioned pulleys out of lumber and rope, and hoisted the wagons, one by one, over the mountains.  Fording rivers meant cutting lumber to build rafts.  It was brutally hard, and not everyone, or the wagons, made it. One of the travelers was David Hudson, age twenty-five, whose sister gave birth to twins en-route. One of them died in the desert. 

The small group settled in Calistoga, which was still Mexican territory.  The ruling Mexican government considered the newcomers to be illegal aliens and would not rent or sell them land.  Fearing war with the US, officials decided strip the group of their supplies an expel them. The former Missourians had not traveled that far to move again without belongings, and a small group, including Hudson, formed the Bear Flag Republic.  Their flag was sewed, in part, from the petticoat of Capp’s great-great aunt.  A few weeks later, US troops claimed the territory, raising the American flag in Sonoma, where Frances Griffith and her parents now lived.  Over a year after leaving Missouri, the surviving wagon party members now had a permanent home.

Capp’s relatives mined for gold before the Gold Rush even started, and were able to purchase property from Dr. Bale that included everything from the Napa River in St. Helena to the Sonoma County line.   Hudson and Griffith were married in the Sonoma Square in 1847 by the new governor of California.  Griffith, then 15, was the first American woman to get married in the State.  One of their sons, Capp’s great uncle, was Rodney Hudson, the first person born in St. Helena.  David Hudson planted vineyards there in 1852, after building a large house, where they raised their five children, including two who survived the Donner Party. In the late 1860s, he sold his property to his vineyard foreman, Jacob Beringer.  The now-famous Hudson House still stands on the property.

Capp’s paternal grandmother married Giuseppi Antonio Caporicci.  A strong woman, she insisted that her new husband become a US citizen and anglicize his name to Joe Capp.  The family stayed in farming. Their youngest son, Robert Lee Capp, took over the business after WWll.  Robert Lee had two children, Dan Capp being the oldest.

Some of Dan’s earliest memories are of working on the farm.  In 1963, he joined and spent four years in the Navy.  After leaving the service, Capp finished college at Cal Poly with a degree in agricultural engineering.  He met Marguerite a month after she turned 17, and it was love at first sight.  He handed her a glass of water, and both felt a spark when their hands touched.  Ironically, neither knew the other had the same electric experience until five years ago.  He took her to her high school prom, and married her a year after she graduated.  The Capps have two children, a son and their daughter-who got married in the new tasting room several months ago.

Dan Capp was the first person to be hired at Franciscan Vineyards, and planted all of their first vineyards.  He and a partner planted their own vineyard in 1973. Sixteen years later, Capp bought his partner out, and has been independent since.   The wine business has changed since Capp first got involved over forty years ago.  It’s big business now, with many small wineries having been swallowed up by large corporations.   While he and Marguerite agreed that it was time for them to start making their own wine, the business model dictated by the corporations made entry into selling it prohibitive.  Capp figured he had three options, travel the country extensively and set up independent distributors, wade through years of the permitting process and then spend millions to build a winery, or open a tasting room.  Option three, which Capp said wouldn’t have made sense ten years ago to open a tasting room in downtown Napa, is today the most logical.

“Opening a tasting room,” means different things to different people, but to the Capps, it meant designing a room that reflects Dan’s heritage as well as their wines.  The space they wanted had the dark, wooden bar from the old Carriage House at the Noyes Mansion in one of the two rooms.  Dan was inspired to design that room the way the lobby of an 1880’s San Francisco hotel would look, an homage to his great-great grandfather.  The room features a pulley system of ceiling fans that conjure up images from a Jules Verne novel.  The second room is done in art deco, a tribute to his mother’s family, and utilizes curves and more feminine colors.  While in the service in Monterey, Capp spent evenings listening to ad hoc musical groups playing in Cannery Row.  Performing on sawdust floors, it was magical, and he wants to recreate that magic in the art deco room.  Music is low key, so that people can talk or focus on the
players, as they wish.  The commercial kitchen in
the building will be increasingly used to produce small plates.

The Capps have built their lives and farms methodically, and intend to let their tasting room   develop at its own pace.  They are much more concerned with organic quality than immediate profits.  Their cabs are terrific, but Marguerite said that if someone was to try only one of their wines, she would suggest the Barbera.  She describes it as “medium to full bodied.  A rich wine with high but not excessive acidity that works well with Italian food.  It is not a wimpy wine.”  The Capps currently produce 2000 cases a year for their labels and sell bulk wine, plus grapes, to others wineries.  Marguerite said that they don’t make cult wines, but good, upper end wines that anyone can drink, any day.  “Our wine is made to be enjoyed with good food,” she said.  “Drink it slowly, and enjoy life.”  The Capps are committed to following her excellent advice.

CanDo’s 2014 Napa Valley Give!Guide

Cover Give Guide 2014HR

by Hilary Zunin

Does lightning ever strike twice? Can the eager debut of a grand idea be sustained in its second year? Will it spark community involvement in 2014 for local nonprofits worthy of your support?

Coming November 1 to a mailbox and website near you, a “portal to the possible.” It’s the 2014 Napa Valley Give!Guide.

A project of Napa Valley CanDo, last year’s debut edition of the Napa Valley Give!Guide started with a bang.  From November 1-December 31, generous valley residents donated over $106,000 to 40 fabulous nonprofit organizations, all serving Napa County. The “Fab 40” represented seven categories of service:  Animals, arts and culture, community, education, environment, health and wellness, and youth and seniors. A new set of 40 nonprofits is featured in the 2014 edition. They include both organizations whose names are household words and small groups doing big things with whom you may not yet be familiar. Half of the nonprofits in this year’s Give!Guide are participating for the first time.

This novel approach to community funding invites locals to donate to one or more stellar nonprofits. Donations begin at $10 and donors may choose to give to one or more groups in varying amounts. Volunteer Olivia Ervin says “We like to put it this way:  You make a choice; you make a difference; the Give!Guide makes it easy.”

The concept consists of two parts:  A catalog featuring the 40 nonprofits is distributed as an insert in the November issue of Marketplace Magazine. At the same time, a user-friendly website, in English and Spanish, includes more information, daily incentives, and a real-time ticker showing how much has been donated to each nonprofit. Beginning November 1, visitors to NapaValleyGiveGuide.org may give to one or many organizations with a single click. For those who prefer to write a check, forms are provided to help ease the selection process. Napa Valley CanDo takes no fee for this project. It’s a labor of love.

Nadia Valenzuela is involved with the Give!Guide for the second year. She and a handful of dynamic volunteers came to the project last year from Leadership Napa Valley. “Our practicum group decided to work with CanDo to bring this exciting project to fruition. Along with the fact that all the funds stay in Napa County, we liked the respect the process demonstrates for each donor. With some other charitable groups, a central authority decides where to put your donations. The Give!Guide allows each donor  to choose exactly where he or she wants their tax-deductible donation to go.

Who is the audience for CanDo’s Give!Guide? “The Guide! is for everyone,” says Hilary Zunin, co-founder of CanDo and a Give!Guide volunteer. “If you care about the Napa Valley, you’re in the right place:  Young people, new donors, folks who’ve never thought of themselves as philanthropists. People who already pledge support with money and time but appreciate that the Give!Guide eases the path from intent to action. Visitors who take away memories and want to leave a little something by way of thanks.”

Along with the concerted efforts of the 40 nonprofits and CanDo volunteers, community partners make it all possible. The Gasser Foundation, Terra Firma, Leadership Napa Valley, Thrive Napa Valley and Napa Valley Marketplace Magazine all provide financial support. Individuals and businesses throughout the Valley offer incentives each day to encourage donors to make that gift:  A massage, a dinner for two, a sparkling necklace. Incentives are noted daily on the Give!Guide website and Facebook pages.

The Napa Valley Vintners do as well, by generously sponsoring the CanDo Spirit Award, a $1000 prize to an exceptional young employee committed to the nonprofit sector. In 2014, Ms. Sarahid Rivera Vazquez of Legal Aid Napa Valley, is that worthy individual.

“The rewards in working at a nonprofit are always rewards for the heart, never the wallet,” says Vazquez. And yet the CanDo Spirit is alive and well in her dedication, “I want to continue to be part of change in my community, one family at a time.” Vazquez will be honored at the 2014 Give!Guide’s Kickoff Celebration , open to the public, on November 6 at the Paul Ash Lobby of the Napa Valley College Performing Arts building. See NapaValleyGiveGuide.org for details.

Look for your copy of the 2014 Napa Valley Give!Guide the November issue of Marketplace. Let’s see if, with your generous support, lightning can strike twice.

List of 40 Nonprofits:

ANIMALS

Napa Humane

Sunrise Horse Rescue

Wildlife Rescue Center
of Napa County

ARTS & CULTURE

Napa County
Historical Society

Napa Valley Youth Symphony

COMMUNITY

Church Women United Clothing Center

Habitat for Humanity

Legal Aid of Napa Valley

Napa Valley Community Housing

Puertas Abiertas Community Resource Center

UpValley Family Centers

Vine Village

EDUCATION

Community Resources
for Children

Connolly Ranch

Girls on the Run Napa Valley

If Given A Chance

Moving Forward Towards Independence

Napa Valley Adult Education

Napa Valley College Child

Development Center

Napa Valley Education Foundation

Teacher Resource Center
of the North Bay

ENVIRONMENT

Napa County Resource Conservation District

Napa-Solano Audubon

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Community Action
of Napa Valley

Cope Family Center

Family Service
of Napa Valley

Napa Emergency Women’s Services

Napa Valley Hospice
& Adult Day Services

The Pathway Home

The Table

YOUTH & SENIORS

Active 20-30 Club of Napa

Big Brothers Big Sisters of the North Bay

Boys & Girls Clubs of Napa Valley

Enchanted Hills Camp for the Blind

Foster Kids Fund

Girl Scouts – Up Valley

Service Unit

Loving Animals
Providing Smiles

Napa CASA,
A Voice for Children

Rianda House Senior Activity Center

Rohlffs Manor